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…Rintendo bikes are awesome?

Rintendo

Rintendo makes a series of bikes that feature some rather… unique forms of power assistance.

The four models include Jokee, a steam-powered bicycle, FIRE Trick BOB with a real jet engine, AQUA trick BOB which uses eight bottles of Diet Pepsi to power an onboard, high pressure water jet, and ELECTRIC BOB, which uses an electric powered propeller to get around.

They’re all custom made in Japan, so actually purchasing one and then shipping it may be a bit of a pain, but if you’ve got the skills to make one of your own, and just needed a bit of inspiration, then let this be it!

[Rintendo - Power Assist Bikes]

…It’s Things Thursday: Zoombicycles?

Zoombicycles

Get up and go with an engine from Zoombicycles, a DIY moped kit that turns any bike into a speed machine with the addition of a 49cc or 80cc 2-stroke motor, gas tank, clutch and throttle controls.

Once you’re up and running, the engines can do between 18 and 30 miles per hour, and gets up to 150 miles per gallon, though the tank isn’t exactly going to take you on any cross-country road trips.

The best part is that because you provide the bike and do the install yourself, the kits are rather cheap, with all the necessary parts setting you back between $100 and $200 depending on options.

If you’ve got the need, then Zoombicycles is here to provide the speed.

[Zoombicycles]

[Via: Retro Thing]

…Shimano wants to shift the way bikes change gears?

Shimano Derailleurs

When speed is everything, anything that shaves off a few seconds can mean the difference between winning and losing, so for Shimano’s new bicycle derailleurs, they’ve gotten rid of cables all together and replaced them with computer controlled motors and gear selectors in an effort to provide smoother and more consistent shifts during the most demanding of races.

They’re not without their detractors however:

“People choose bicycles precisely because a bicycle’s motion requires only human effort, and nothing could be more simple, independent and autonomous,” said Raymond Henry, a cycling historian in St. Etienne, France. “Any source of external energy, however weak, runs counter to this philosophy.”

As with any new technology, these things don’t come cheap, and initial systems are expected to add about $1,250 onto the cost of an already expensive system, but if they can prove their reliability and speed up a rider’s pace, they just might be shifting the gears of every high-dollar race bike in a few years time.

[Via: The New York Times Via: Gizmodo]

…Trek’s District gives you the belt?

Trek District

Bicycles with belt drives used to be a boutique only feature just a few years ago, but as more and more people seek an alternative to automotive transportation, more and more bike companies are looking for ways to make the bike more consumer friendly.

Unlike a chain, belt drives keep you pant cuffs clean and your ride quiet, but they also can’t be repaired as easily or as on the spot as a chain can, and the price is also somewhat prohibitive.

Trek District Belt

However, when you want to live on the cutting edge, sometimes there are sacrifices that just have to be made.

Click below to check out Trek’s District, and see what the future has in store.

[Trek - District]

[Via: Gizmodo]