Tag Archives | Aerodynamics

…The Singer 911 is a classic Porsche re-imagined?

Singer Vehicle Design

The Singer 911 is “the love child of a 1967 911S, a 1973 911 Carrera RS and a 1996 993 RS”.

Singer 911

The company, Singer Vehicle Design, starts with an ‘80s-era 911 donor car, and then strips it down to just a bare shell to begin building their creation from the ground up.

New bits and pieces include chassis stiffening, aerodynamics, a roll cage, and full carbon fiber bodywork.

Singer 911 Detail

The heart of the monster is a 3.82-liter flat-six making 425 horsepower and spinning to 8,000 RPM on its way to powering the 2,400-pound car to 60mph in just 3.9 seconds.

Suspension upgrades include Moton shock absorbers, Eibach coil-overs, and Smart Racing Products adjustable sway bars, with four-piston brakes from a Porsche 930 bringing the whole thing to a stop in a hurry.

Singer 911 Interior

All told, it’s an excellent package that will appeal to any classic Porsche fan that wants top of the line performance in an old school wrapper.

[Singer Vehicle Design]

…It’s Tuner Tuesday: Ferrari 599XX?

Ferrari 599XX

Ferrari’s 599 GTB Fiorano is already a potent pony, so when the Italians decided to put their stallion through the XX program (which was responsible for cars like the Enzo FXX and the FXX Evoluzione) the ears of millionaires around the world definitely perked up.

Ferrari 599XX Side Rear

The end result of Ferrari’s poking, prodding, tuning and trimming is called the 599XX, and it’s the fastest road car they’ve ever produced. (Though calling this a road car is a bit of a stretch.)

Ferrari 599XX Detail

The ‘extreme track car’ bumps power to 700 hp at 9,000 rpm, and uses carbon fiber wherever possible to bring the weight down while increasing aerodynamic downforce. Other neat goodies include F1 style ‘doughnuts’ over the brake discs that improve aerodynamics and brake cooling, carbon fiber brake pads, and a whole host of active aerodynamic components they call the ‘ActiflowT’ system.

Like previous XX cars, the 599XX will be invitation only, so if you don’t already have a few Ferraris parked outside, this won’t be the next addition, but for the select few, Ferrari has created a car that will more than likely defy belief.

[Ferrari 599XX]

…It’s Tuner Tuesday: Sector111 Exige?

Sector111 Exige

The Lotus Exige is already a rather remarkable little car, so when you take it and hand it off to a tuner, the results are often mind blowing.

Sector111’s Exige is a prime example of that fact. The track-tuned terror is ready to take on any supercar thanks to a roots hybrid supercharger that brings horsepower up to 240+. (Which doesn’t sound like much, until you remember that the car weights just 2,000 lbs with a full tank and a fat driver.

Sector111 Exige Details

With great power comes great responsibility however, so the Sector111 Exige also includes aerodynamic enhancements like a carbon fiber front splitter, undertray, 5-element rear diffuser, side skirts, rear wing, and arch louvers. In addition, carbon fiber body mods include a CF roof, rear hatch, access panels, and side scoops to keep weight down without sacrificing aerodynamic performance.

An AP Racing Big Brake Kit brings everything to a halt when needed, and a Nitron Exige GT3 triple adjustable suspension system keeps all four wheels planted through even the most pant soiling turns.

Want more?

That’s just too damn bad, because there’s just not much left on the car to modify! (Lightweight valve stems coming soon…)

[Sector111]

[Via: Serious Wheels]

…It’s Tuner Tuesday: Bloodhound SSC?

Bloodhound SSC

The Bloodhound SSC is more rocket than car, and aims to shatter the current world land speed record with a goal of 1,000 mph, or 31% faster than any four-wheeled vehicle has gone before.

Powering the Bloodhound SSC is a jet/hybrid rocket mix that uses a rocket for its raw power and a lack of draggy air intake, and a Eurojet EJ-200 jet engine for controlled output that allows the Bloodhound SSC team to increase Mach numbers in small, careful steps.

In addition to power, the Bloodhound SSC needs to be controllable, so little winglets above each wheel act as fully dynamic trimmers that make small adjustments in microsconds to maintain constant wheel load up to Mach 1.4.

Bloodhound SSC Detail

In the middle of the Bloodhound SSC sits a MCT V12 race engine that makes over 800 horsepower. This might sound like an impressive figure, but when you’re goal is 1,000 mph, it’s not even close to what you need, so the V12 is just there for hydraulic power, starting the EJ-200, and pumping more than a ton of High Test Peroxide through the Falcon rocket in just 22 seconds at 1200 psi.

Another important element of a car like this that few people think about is the airflow. The fin needs to be a balance of high speed stability and low speed wind resistance, and even the rear wheel covers have been designed to minimize drag caused by the airflow around the wheel, since an unprotected wheel would see oncoming airflow at the top reach speeds of Mach 2.8 if left unprotected.

So what does a run to 1,000 mph look like?

Bloodhound SSC Record Run

Bloodhound SSC will accelerate from rest using an EJ-200 jet engine, taking it up to 300mph.
At that point (a) the rocket will be ignited, so that it and the jet are operating simultaneously, thereby increasing the acceleration to well over 2g.

Having reached maximum speed (1,050mph), the rocket thrust will be stopped (point b), but the jet engine will continue burning for a few seconds.

During this brief period, the car will decelerate at about 1.5g. When the jet engine also stops (point c), the deceleration will peak at nearly 3g.

When the vehicle slows to subsonic speeds the aerodynamic drag will reduce dramatically, slowing the deceleration of the vehicle. Two additional deceleration peaks are shown on the curves (points d and e), indicating the release of two parachutes. At low speeds, below 200mph, hydraulically operated disc brakes can be used.

The land speed record is calculated from the average times of the car over two runs (to eliminate the effect of wind and other variables) so the car must then stop, refuel, turn around, and do the run all over again within an hour to claim the title.

Can they do it?

We’ll just have to wait to find out, but it sure looks like they’re taking steps in the right direction!

[Bloodhound SSC]

…Audi’s R8 GT3 is ready to race?

Audi R8 GT3

Go racing in style with Audi’s R8 GT3.

Designed to compete in rear-wheel-drive, GT3-spec racing, the R8 GT3 will more than likely break through the 500 HP barrier, as well as tack on a six-speed sequential sports gearbox, tons of carbon fiber bits and pieces, and the aerodynamic changes seen here. Due to GT3 rules, the suspension will more or less stay the same, but who’s going to complain about that?

[Via: Baxter Finley]