Tag Archives | API

…Flickr is mapping the world?

Flickr Alpha Map

Flickr has collected almost ninety million geotagged photos, and for every geotagged photo they have up to six Where On Earth IDs, which are unique numeric identifiers that correspond to the hierarchy of places where a photo was take: the neighborhood, the town, the country, and so on up to the continent in a process called reverse-geocoding.

Eventually they got to thinking: If they plotted all of the geotagged photos associated with a particular WOE ID, would there be enough data to generate a mostly accurate contour of that place?

Apparently the answer is yes, and though it’s not a perfect representation of the place, it’s definitely getting pretty close.

As a gift to the Flickr community, they’ve even made these 150,000 (and counting) WOE IDs with proper (-ish) shape data available via the Flickr API.

It might be a fun toy right now, but give it a few years and add in all of the data from geocoded cell phone photos, and this just might be the future of cartography as we know it.

[Flickr Code – The Shape Of Alpha]

…PleaseDress.Me is tee-rific?


PleaseDress.Me is the ultimate t-shirt search engine.

Designed by Gary Vaynerchuk (of winelibrary.tv fame), AJ Vaynerchuk, and Joe Stump (lead architect for digg.com), PleaseDress.Me allows you to sift through the vast expanse of online t-shirts using searches by keyword/tag, color, price, or even random generation if you’re feeling especially indecisive.

    PleaseDressMe is a classic example of scratching ones own itch. AJ, Gary, and Joe love finding great new tees, but finding said tees wasn’t the easiest thing in the world. Rather than sifting through multiple websites [they] figured why not just go to one website that makes searching t-shirts easy? Once [they] came to that conclusion, Joe went right to coding and after a few calculated keystrokes [they] brought in Chris to make it pretty. The result is the simple, concise t-shirt search engine.

In addition to being a tee-rific resource for shirt enthusiasts, PleaseDress.Me is also a fantastic example of how to use Web 2.0 methods of promotion to get your product into the public eye.

PleaseDress.Me has an account on Twitter, a custom Firefox search box plugin, customizable widgets, an easy vendor upload process, a Facebook page, an open API, a send to a friend feature, badges for shirt vendors to display, and a full gamut of social bookmarking options, including Facebook, Digg, Pownce, Twitter, Delicious, and StumbleUpon.

So besides being a great example of how to promote a new website, does it actually work?

To test it out, I typed in the word “Ninja”, clicked Search, and was greeted with the following results:


A ninja playing a tuba, a teenage mutant ninja turtle in a shredder, a ninja and pirate shirt, and smurfs acting like ninjas?

I’d say it works pretty damn well.

Give it a shot:

Each result features the price, a more info button, a StumbleUpon button, a Facebook button, and a Buy Now button. Clicking on a result’s more info button gives you that shirt’s chosen tags, as well as related shirts that you can view as well.

All in all, I’d say that it’s a fantastic service that makes searching for and actually finding shirts you’re looking for a quick and easy process, and that anyone looking for that perfect shirt to complete that perfect outfit should definitely check it out.

Now PleaseDress.Me!


…Facebook isn’t MySpace?


When Facebook first arrived, it was great. You used it to talk with your friends, you used it to poke someone if you wanted to say hi but didn’t want to say much else, and you used it to join groups of people with similar interests.

Then, pictures came along, and suddenly, you could even see what your friends were doing.

Everything was great. You could keep in touch with your friends (even the ones half way across the country), there weren’t a lot of ads, and it wasn’t MySpace.

Then, things started to fall apart.

Facebook opened up its API, and in my opinion, the entire site went down the drain (and quickly).

It became a collection of random widgets and wingdings, and I now no longer want to go to the site. I don’t care if a “zombie” friend just bit me; I don’t care what you posted on your friend’s Graffiti wall (that looks like it was made with MS Paint); and I certainly don’t want you to buy me a fake drink.

I just want to see what you did, what you’re doing, and what you’re going to do. Sadly, each day it’s getting harder and harder to do so.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I understand the Mr. Zuckerberg is trying to value his company at $15 Billion (That’s right, billion with a B.), and to do so he’s got to show that it can make money; but I think that at some point along its growth curve, Facebook forgot what made people switch: It wasn’t MySpace.

MySpace was messy and noisy and dirty. Facebook was clean and quiet and simple. You signed on, you sent a few messages, and you were done.

Sadly, applications have ruined all that, and unless Facebook can find a way of monetizing without clutterizing, I think it’s going to be tough times for the Wonder Company. (Though I still think that in the end, Mark is going to make off like a bandit regardless of what happens to the site. Hellooooo billionaire status.)

Thankfully, at least a few people agree. Read/Write Web recently wrote a post titled “Facebook: What If More Is Less?”, and in the post, they spend a majority of the time going over many of the same problems that I have just described.

In essence, Facebook has turned into a love it or hate it site, and the haters are gaining ground.

So what do you think? Has Facebook lost what made it so special, or have I just lost my argument? Let me know below.

[Read/Write Web – Facebook: What If Less Is More?]



…Digg is a killer?


DiggKiller: The Game is a clever use of the Digg API that turns the site into a space shooter game.

By shooting at the enemy (Or is it bury?), you decrease its Digg score until it reaches zero and explodes in a shower of good and bad comments.

You then collect these comments for an increase in weapon power, as well as a few power-ups that are triggered by certain comment keywords.

Additional weapons include the Rose Bomb and the F-Bomb, and there are plenty of surprises in store during the later levels.


[DiggKiller: The Game]

[Via: Digg]