Tag Archives | Canvas

…It’s Things Thursday: TOMS Shoes?

TOMS Shoes

TOMS Shoes might be made of canvas and certified vegan, but they’re also much more than that: They’re the driving force behind a movement to give the world a decent pair of shoes.

That’s because for every pair of TOMS Shoes that you buy, they’ll give a pair of TOMS Shoes to a child in need. So far, this One For One plan has given over 140,000+ pairs of shoes to children, and in 2009 alone, they plan on giving away more than 300,000 pairs.

Don’t take my word for it though. Check out the video, give the site a look, and see if your next pair of shoes should do more than just make your feet look good.

[TOMS Shoes]

…Microsoft tested Photosynth on the Obama Inauguration?

Microsoft Photosynth Inauguration

Microsoft has been testing their Photosynth software for some time now, but with so many people snapping away with their cameras during the Inauguration, now’s probably the perfect time to see what getting ‘synthy’ is all about.

The goal of Photosynth is to take a bunch of photos and create an experience that has the cinematic quality of a movie, the control of a video game, and the mind-blowing detail of the real world. Photosynth was the result of two independent breakthroughs: The ability to reconstruct a scene or object from a bunch of flat photographs, and the technology to bring that experience to virtually anyone over the Internet:

It works by examining images for similarities to each other and using that information to estimate the shape of the subject and the vantage point each photo was taken from. With this information, Photosynth then recreates the space and uses it as a canvas to display and navigate through the photos. Here’s a little video on the history and inspiration behind Photosynth:

It’s probably one of those ‘see it to believe it’ technologies, so head on over to Photosynth’s special Inauguration page and check out the different Synths that were created during the event.

[Microsoft Photosynth – Inauguration]

[Via: FlowingData]

…It’s TGI Friday: Defender Of The Favicon?

Defender Of The Favicon

Defender Of The Favicon is definitely the smallest game ever featured on DYH.

Designed as a test to see how far you can push the concept of a generated favicon, the idea was to pack a retro shooter into 16×16 pixels using JavaScript, Canvas and Data: URIs

From start to finish, the game took just three nights to complete.

To get everything working: Each frame is generated on the fly in JavaScript into a 16×16 canvas element, then converted to a 32bits PNG images and used in place of the Favicon.

    The game logic isn’t really complex but remains true to the original Defender and provides enough action for 16×16 pixels. The original game mechanics would make Defender of the favicon insanely difficult. Therefore a few adjustments were done : none of the enemies fire at you, your Defender got upgraded with a shield, and finally the Landers do not mutate into unstoppable war machines after abducting a humanoid but wander in your general direction.

[Defender Of The Favicon]

…It’s Things Thursday: Custom 52?

Custom 52

Custom 52 wants to know what the art world can do with a deck of cards.

“Meant to inspire and bring together the artistic community in a new and exciting way”, Custom 52 is “an online design community using playing cards as [a] canvas.”

Artists submit their ideas, and then the public votes to pick the best ones. The top 52 designs are then printed onto a deck of playing cards that “everyone can enjoy and spread across the land.”

It’s an interesting idea, and the first cycle of cards are amazingly creative and beautiful, so spice up your next poker night with a set of Custom 52s.

[Custom 52]

[Via: Josh Spear]

…Joe Bravo makes tortilla art?

Tortilla Art

Joe Bravo must have been hungry when he decided to become an artists, because tortillas have become his canvas of choice. Why? I’ll let Joe explain it:

    I use the Tortilla as a Canvas because it is an integral part of the Hispanic Culture and my heritage. For the subject matter of my tortilla paintings, I use imagery that is representative of Latinos, conveying their hopes, art, beliefs and history. As the tortilla has given us life, I give it new life by using it as an art medium.

Joe doesn’t just use any old tortilla though:

    The preparation of the tortilla for painting is as important as the actual painting itself. I first bake several tortillas to get the right texture, shape and coloration for the image I want to paint.

When finished, the acrylic paintings are sealed to prevent against moisture and insects (and hungry art connoisseurs), and then displayed for the world to enjoy. Tasty.

[Joe Bravo – Tortilla Art]

[Via: Neatorama]