Tag Archives | Controversial

…Robots have sex?

Sex Lives Of Robots

It’s not exactly porn, but Michael Sullivan’s The Sex Life of Robots isn’t far off.

The ‘actors’ that he crafted out of Barbie Dolls, G.I. Joe action figures and other toys were originally going to star in a robot war movie, but as the project evolved, Michael decided to take it in a different direction.

Now, through stop-motion animation, he has created a film that is potentially more controversial than anything else he was going to create, having been pulled from YouTube after

Somebody’s mom complained, you know, because they didn’t want their kid watching, you know, some robot stick his dick in a horse’s butt.

I guess you can’t fault the man for censoring his vision!

If you’d like to see what all the commotion is about, then the (semi-NSFW) video below provides a preview, and if you’re in the area, Manhattan’s Museum of Sex will be showing the actual dolls that went into the creation of the film.

[Via: Gizmodo]

…Photos can be fun without edits?

Tell A Lie

Considering last week’s Iranian missile story, I though that Henry Hadlow’s Tell A Lie project was rather fitting:

    The most controversial lies told with photography today are those told by news photographers who manipulate their work photographs to tell a different story, for example, Liu Weiqiang‘s faked photograph of antelope and the China-Tibet rail link.

He also ads that he wanted to “flip this lie on its head and use a camera to mimic common Photoshop effects”.

Along those same lines, I thought that Fubiz’s Google Images idea was another fantastic way to take a photo with a digital spin that gives it a simple yet fun effect:

Google Images

[Henry Hadlow – Tell A Lie]

[Fubiz – Google Images]

…It’s Website Wednesday: StreetArtLocator?


The StreetArtLocator (v2) helps you locate street art near you. (Considering the name, the obviousness of that statement is not lost on me…)

With specific tags for graffiti, galleries, paintings, stickers, stencils, sculptures, and installations, it’s a Google Map powered guide to the beautiful art that’s all around you for controversially public consumption.

Just click on your area to see both a location and a picture of the street art that has been spotted and documented. Then, if you’re out and about and come across something that you’d like to share, just snap a pic and add it to the database to help those around you enjoy your find as well.


[Via: Juxtapoz]

…Bomb It explores graffiti?

Bomb It

Bomb It “is the explosive new documentary from award-winning director Jon Reiss investigating the most subversive and controversial art form currently shaping international youth culture: graffiti”.

    Through interviews and guerilla footage of graffiti writers in action on 5 continents, Bomb It tells the story of graffiti from its origins in prehistoric cave paintings thru its notorious explosion in New York City during the 70’s and 80’s, then follows the flames as they paint the globe. Featuring old school legends and current favorites such as Taki 183, Cornbread, Stay High 149, T-Kid, Cope 2, Zephyr, Revs, Os Gemeos, KET, Chino, Shepard Fairey, Revok, and Mear One. This cutting edge documentary tracks down today’s most innovative and pervasive street artists as they battle for control over the urban visual landscape. You’ll never look at public space the same way again.

Locations include Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Tijuana, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Hamburg, Berlin, Cape Town, São Paulo, and Tokyo, so all the hot spots are covers as well.

Conclusion: If you have even a passing interest in graffiti, its history, its effect, and its current status, then Bomb It looks like a can’t miss film.

[Bomb It]

[Via: Juxtapoz]

…The Bridge and The King of Kong are fantastic documentaries?

I watched two fantastic (and fantastically different) documentaries this weekend, so I’ve decided to make this post a hybrid review of both.

The BridgeFirst, there was The Bridge, a morbid (and controversial) yet fascinating look at those that decide to end their lives by jumping off of the Golden Gate Bridge.

For a year, director Eric Steel aimed his cameras at the majestic and iconic bridge, capturing nearly two-dozen suicides and an equally high number of prevented or failed attempts. Switching between long, beautiful shots of the bridge and close, almost biographical shots of those teetering on the edge of life, it juxtaposes the two sides of the bridge perfectly, and you find yourself engulfed by a landmark with a personality all its own.

The Bridge also features interviews with the friends, family, and loved ones of each jumper, and attempts to explain the story and the history of those featured. You slowly begin to understand a little bit of what each person was going through, and you can see their affect on those around them.

And then they jump.

If the thought of watching someone end his or her life in front of an unknown eye disturbs you, then this film is definitely not for you; but if you’re interested in trying to understand what someone goes through at the lowest of lows, then I can’t think of a better way to do it.

King Of Kong: A Fistful Of QuartersSecond, there was King of King: A Fistful of Quarters, a humorous and touching look at those that have decided to dedicate a part of their lives to becoming the best in the world at their classic video game of choice.

The two “stars” are the perfect poster children for a hobby that only a select few find excitement in. Steve Wiebe, the family man who sits in his garage and games away while his family stands by and supports his quest, goes against Billy Mitchell, the long haired hot sauce salesman who has held the title for over twenty years, yet struggles to live up to the crown that he has placed upon his own head.

Though a film about video game records doesn’t exactly sound like an attention grabber, this film manages to capture the heart and soul of each gamer through interviews and over the shoulders in a way that draws you in and makes you a part of the action. You feel for the two men and their quest (along with the handful of supporting characters), and you begin to understand how these games can become a symbol of something more than just the record.

[The Bridge]

[King Of Kong: A Fistful Of Quarters]

[Rotten Tomatoes – The Bridge]

[Rotten Tomatoes – King Of Kong: A Fistful Of Quarters]