Tag Archives | Hardware

…It’s Things Thursday: Deckstool?

Deckstool

Jason Podlaski takes broken skateboard decks and turns them into unique pieces of furniture called Deckstools.

Each Deckstool is made from recycled skateboard parts, and “the scrapes and scars on the decks create beautiful patterns over the original skateboard artwork”.

The stools are even assembled using original skateboard trucks for hardware, giving them an extra bit of authenticity and leaving nothing to waste. Plus, since each one is made using a used and broken board, each one is a unique and limited edition run of one.

[Deckstool]

…New gadgets are just a hack away?

Depression

Has the damaged economy managed to crush your new gadget budget?

Instead of sitting around and complaining, why not make your old things new again with a few “creative” hacks?

To help you along the path to recycled gadget goodness, Gizmodo has put together a guide to Zero-Cost Gadget Upgrades, including turning your Xbox, PC or Apple TV into a genuine media center, hacking your iPod with Rockbox, converting your PC into a Mac, flashing your crappy router’s firmware with DD-WRT to turn it into a top-of-the-line piece of hardware, downloading new maps for your old GPS, jailbreaking your iPhone for Wi-Fi Internet tethering, and modding your Wii to create a free emulation machine.

Who said the next great depression had to be so depressing?

[Gizmodo – Zero-Cost Gadget Upgrades For The Next Great Depression]

…It’s Things Thursday: Nimbus Cloud Computer?

Nimbus Cloud Computer

The Nimbus Cloud Computer “works like a PC” only it’s “better than a PC” because it’s free. Instead of paying for the Nimbus, you simply allow them to show you an ad while using the computer, and it pays for itself. If you don’t want the ad, you can also pay a monthly fee to use the Nimbus ad free, but where’s the fun in that?

    A Cloud Computer is a re-imagination of the idea of a computer. We think that an ordinary computer is too expensive, too complicated, and too much for what most people want to use a computer for. What we did is put all of the costly and complicated pieces of hardware and software into our data centers. You then use a smaller, simpler, much less expensive device that’s always connected to the internet to control your computer. We think this is a much better way for you to do just what you want with a computer.

The computer comes with a keyboard and mouse, and you simply provide a monitor and Internet access, and you’re on your way.

Is this the future of computing?

[Nimbus Cloud Computer]

[Via: Spark Plugging]

…You can make your own TV-B-Gone?

TV-B-Gone

TV-B-Gone is a small electrical device that turns off any TV with the push of a button from up to 100 feet away.

Now, with an open source hardware kit from Adafruit and a bit of soldering skill, you can make your own TV-B-Gone.

The kit comes with everything but the tools and the batteries, and is supposedly a “very simple kit and great for people who have never soldered anything before.”

[Adafruit – TV-B-Gone Kit]

[TV-B-Gone]

[Via: MAKE: Blog]

…Macworld is great for bingo?

Macworld Keynote Bingo

If a drinking game isn’t the way you want to celebrate the “just the beginning” keynote announcement, try some simpler fun with the Macworld Bingo board. Some of the descriptions are a little confusing, so half the fun is trying to figure out if something has actually happened, but it should be a great way to check out the announcements. One more thing, bonus points to anyone who yells out Bingo! during the actual Macworld keynote. I’d do it myself if only I had the opportunity. I think it’d definitely be worth the swift kick out of Mac Meca.

  • Mac Pro Octo – A Mac Pro model with eight cores (in any number of physical chips).
  • Leopard release date – The exact day that Mac OS X Leopard will be released.
  • Virtualization in Leopard – Any virtualization features built into Leopard. This includes the ability to run any other foreign OS within Leopard, including earlier versions of Mac OS.
  • New video iPod – Any new iPod that can play video, excluding storage bumps of existing video iPods.
  • New look in Leopard – Mac OS X Leopard includes significant changes to the look of the standards elements of the UI (windows, buttons, scroll-bars, etc.)
  • MacBook Thin – A new laptop with a screen smaller than any existing MacBook or MacBook Pro.
  • iPhone – Any new non-desktop/laptop Apple hardware product that can make phone calls. (VoIP counts.)
  • New MacBook Pro – Any new MacBook Pro model, including speed or storage bumps.
  • “One more thing…” – When Steve Jobs says there’s “one more thing.” A slide containing the phrase is also acceptable, even if Jobs does not actually say it.
  • Hardware product not presented by Jobs – A major new hardware product is presented by someone other than Steve Jobs.
  • New desktop Mac (not Mac Pro) – A new desktop Mac product that is not a Mac Pro. (New iMacs count.)
  • iPods with cameras – Any iPod with a camera in it or attached to it. (An “iPod Phone” counts if “iPod” is in the name.)
  • No iPhone – A new non-desktop/laptop Apple hardware product that can make phone calls is not announced.
  • ZFS mentioned – ZFS is mentioned by a presenter. Text on a slide does not count. The presenter must say it.
  • iTV named – The product previously discussed as “iTV” is officially named (even if the official name is “iTV”).
  • New displays with cameras – New Apple displays with built-in or otherwise attached cameras.
  • Illuminous – The word “illuminous” is spoken or appears on any slide.
  • “Otomatic” – When Steve Jobs says any derivative of the word “automatic”, which he pronounces in his own odd way with ah “oh” sound at the start of the word.
  • iTV does HD – The device known as iTV supports HDTV resolution (480p does not count).
  • iPhoto performance touted – The speed of iPhoto when dealing with large numbers of photos is touted.
  • “Boom” – When Steve Jobs says the word “boom” while demonstrating something.
  • New app added to iWork – A new application is added to Pages and Keynote in the iWork bundle.
  • Leopard != $129 – Mac OS X Leopard single-user price is not $129.
  • Universal Adobe or MS Office demo – Any demonstration of a Universal binary build of any Adobe product or any part of Microsoft Office. I’ll accept something less than a full-blown demo (e.g., just some screenshots or a marketing spiel) if you need this square to win, but it has to be delivered by an Adobe or Microsoft representative.

[Macworld Keynote Bingo]

[Via: Digg]