Tag Archives | High-End

…It’s Things Thursday: MiniWatt?


The MiniWatt tube amp might be the world’s smallest, and it might only put out a meager 2.5 watts per channel, but that doesn’t stop it from delivering full, robust sound that is wow’ing audiophile reviewers the world over. In fact, ToneAudio magazine recently named the MiniWatt their “Product of the Year” in the budget audio category.

Sure, it only has one stereo input, and it’ll still set you back $269, but if you’re looking for high-end sound quality for a (relatively) low-end price, then you can’t do much better than the MiniWatt.


[Via: CNET]

…Cryo Performance Computing will build you a kick-ass PC?

Cryo Performance Computing

The following is a sponsored (though unbiased) post: Cryo Performance Computing makes custom gaming PC’s and high performance desktop computers for a number of different users, including gamers, professionals, audio, video & multimedia creators, and home theater buffs.

Each computer that Cryo makes is specially designed to perform at the peak of its potential, and they utilize a number of different tools and techniques to reach that potential, including a process called blueprinting and “Cryo Boost”.

Blueprinting is when they design a system by looking at each of the components to make sure there is no ‘least common denominator’ holding everything else back. For instance, if you buy the top of the line video card, but your processor can’t handle it, then you’re not getting the full capability out of your video card. To prevent that from happening, Cryo “carefully selects individual components that [they] know will all compliment each other and work well together”.

Cryo Boost is a process that Cryo uses to go beyond just overclocking and performance tuning into a whole new and revolutionary way of designing, building and testing a PC. This “end-to-end lifecycle of innovative idea to end product” includes:

  • User requirement driven design
  • Reference to a huge knowledgebase of component experience
  • Experienced industry professionals
  • Disciplined and thorough testing and verification
  • Just-in-time building and fulfillment
  • Technology and delivery partners
  • Participation in Web 2.0, blogs and forums

Which results in:

  • 30-50% better performance over any mainstream manufacturer
  • 30% longer product lifecycle
  • Reduced obsolescence
  • Over-engineered key components
  • Personal and individual service

One thing to note is that Cryo is based in the UK, so you’ll need to take things like warranty and shipping into consideration before making your purchase (for instance, they do their pricing in Pounds) but considering the fact that they’ve been “architecting, designing and building PC technology hardware and software for over 20 years”, I don’t think you should have any problems with their products.

Plus, if you need even more convincing that they know their stuff, just check out their ‘Free Stuff’ area, where they’ve posted a number of technical articles, useful tools and useful links, as well as their ‘Cryo Benchmarks’, where they show off various performance reports that have been done on their system, including the Custom PC Benchmark record that they set with the Velox in December of 2008.

[Cryo Performance Computing]

…Denim factories are interesting places?

Denim Factory

David Friedman recently had a chance to tour through a denim factory in Kentucky that specializes in high-end jean distressing for top labels and designers, and if you’ve ever wondered what goes into making the perfect fade or loosening just the right amount of fabric to make those hundred dollar and up jeans you always see at the stores, then it’s definitely worth a look.

[David Friedman – Photo Essay: The Denim Factory]

[Via: Kottke]

…Paganis sound good?

Pagani Stereo

Apparently, automakers that dabble in carbon fiber also have a penchant for high-end stereo equipment, because they seem to enjoy lending their name to pieces of audio art.

This Pagani system features an aluminum and carbon fiber turntables, CD player, and speaker pair that’s designed to mimic the Zonda’s sound system controls with additional details like the Zonda exhaust themed ports tying the two together.

I guess if you an afford a Zonda, then they assume you can afford something like this; because I don’t imagine shock absorbing carbon fiber turntables are a cheap addition to any home.



…You can Mac for cheap with a Hackintosh?


Like the looks of Apple’s new OS, but still trying to stay loyal to Windows?

Then check out Lifehacker’s Hackintosh guide for information on how to build a high-end computer that’s confused about its identity using OSx86.

    The build consists of a 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, a total of 4GB of RAM (four sticks at 1GB each), an ASUS P5W DH Deluxe motherboard, a GeForce 7300GT (the same basic video card that comes installed in the default Mac Pro configuration), a 500GB hard drive, a DVD burner, and an Antec Sonata case.

So what’s all of this going to cost you?

$800, plus the cost of the OS.

Not bad for a system whose closest competitor is the $600 Mac Mini with half the specs.

[Lifehacker – Build A Hackintosh Mac For Under $800]