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…It’s Movie Monday: Three Legged Legs?

Three Legged Legs

Today’s Movie Monday features the work of Three Legged Legs. What is Three Legged Legs, you ask? Well, it’s “a hillbilly with stinky hobbit feet, an angry brown guy freaking out all the time, and a guy who likes wearing collared shirts under regular cotton t-shirts”.

The first film is a shorty but a goodie. Humans!, a 60 second global awareness PSA “sensationalizing the excessive, all-consuming nature of the human being”, shows the Earth’s “utter demise in a fun and sickening kind of way”.

The next “animated fable”, Samurai, was a collaboration between TLL and GE for their Imagination Theater campaign. “It’s a tale of a pint-sized samurai faced with a seemingly impossible challenge as proposed by a behemoth Emperor and his wicked minions. Can you spot all the ninjas?”.

Their next short, Los Angeles Lets Be Friends, “depicts friendly monsters overrunning Los Angeles to spread joy and beauty throughout an otherwise drab and monochromatic society. Despite the creatures’ best efforts, the public isn’t swayed”.

Finally, Ricochet, a short “featured primarily as a visual effects showcase”, that “puts the viewer in the middle of an all out battle between two disparate armies set in an apocalyptic near-future environment”. Be warned though, this one gets violent.

You Tube Awards

Bonus: If that didn’t satisfy your movie appetite for the day, be sure to check out YouTube’s 2006 Video Awards Winners. You’ve probably seen most of them already, but maybe you missed one or two, so it’s always good to go back.

[Three Legged Legs]

[YouTube – Video Awards]

…The brain doesn’t like to practice?

According to a Stanford University study, no matter how often you practice something, you’ll never be able to do it the same way every time because your brain can’t plan the action in the same way every time. “It’s as if every time the brain plans a movement, it has to start form scratch. Practice and training can help improve certain actions, but humans and other primates simply aren’t wired for consistency like machines or computers”. So it’s not true; practice doesn’t make perfect. Who knew?

[HealthScout]

[Via: Digg]