Tag Archives | Kindle

…TechCrunch is building a web tablet?

TechCrunch Tablet

When TechCrunch’s Michael Arrington put out a call for the creation of a sub-$200 net tablet that took the netbook idea, threw out the keyboard, and added a little Kindle flavor for good measure, I was excited by the idea, but humbled by the slim chance that this thing had to actually make it to market.

Well, six months and two prototypes later, there’s apparently a working model of what this device might become:

Using a Via Nano processor, 1GB of RAM, 4GB of flash memory, a touchscreen for onscreen keyboarding and Ubuntu, the unit boots, connects, and surfs just like you would want it to.

Unfortunately, it looks like the sub-$200 price point may have been too ambitious for the first go-round, but with a realistic target of $299 now set, it looks like this might actually see the light of day.

They did however add that:

The real question for us is whether this project has legs and should go forward towards production units, which is a very big step from a working prototype. That would require spinning the company off from the blog and building a team around Louis. It’s a decision we haven’t made yet.

Despite the challenges that this device still faces, I hope that someone picks it up and runs with it, because I wouldn’t mind kicking back on the couch with the Internet at my fingertips for a hair under $300.

[TechCrunch – Tablet Update: Prototype B]

…It’s Things Thursday: Amazon Kindle 2?

Amazon Kindle 2

Amazon’s Kindle brought the eBook to the masses, and with the Kindle 2, they’re hoping an evolution of the design will help even more people discover the convenience of digital reading.

At just over 1/3 of an inch thick, and weighing in at just 10.2 ounces, it’s much smaller and lighter than you would expect, and with free 3G wireless connectivity, you can enjoy a book whenever and wherever you happen to be.

The Kindle 2 also features a new display that can show up to 16 shades of gray, 25% longer battery life, enough storage for 1,500 books, 20% faster page turns, and even a new text-to-speech feature that reads your content to you if you’re feeling particularly lazy.

Since just about every blog in existence has already profiled and reviewed the Kindle 2, I thought I’d just gather together a few of their thoughts so that you can see what everyone thinks of this device:

Engadget: “It really does feel great in hand. The brushed metal back is great, the device is incredibly light and comfortable to hold, and the keyboard is fairly usable. We’re not convinced the five-way joystick is the best they possible could’ve worked into this space- a d-pad seems much more logical – but it’s responsive and comfortable enough to twiddle with for what it is.”

Gizmodo: “The overall handfeel is a lot nicer. While part of me loves the snowspeeder original, this just feels better in your hand, and it obviously looks a lot slicker. Though at the same time, that iPod-like slickness is a bit less daring than the original.”

CrunchGear: “The difference in size is absolutely the most striking aspect of the new Kindle. Text-to-Speech is cool, but this is day and night when it comes to size.”

Ars Technica: “Overall, I have to say that the Kindle 2 is a far superior device to the first iteration, and really shows an attention to detail that, based on the earlier device, it wasn’t clear that Amazon had in it. More significantly, perhaps, is the fact that the company has clearly made sensible fixes to many of the problems, which demonstrates a clear commitment to listening to its customers. The changes give me hope that, when the hardware’s ready, the remaining issues (primarily the keyboard and the small screen) will be fixed. It makes me anxious to see what’s in store for Kindle 3.”

[Amazon – Kindle 2]

…Amazon bought The Tales of Beedle The Bard?

Amazon must want news stories with the words “Amazon” and “Book” in the title to help promote the Kindle, because how else can you justify spending $3.98 million for one of seven hand-written volumes of J.K. Rowling’s “The Tales of Beedle the Bard” (A real life version of the book that was a collection of fairy tales that Dumbledoor gave to Hermione to help them find Lord Voldermort in the last Harry Potter book.)

Rowling created seven copies of the book, then gave six away to friends and family, with one remaining for public sale. While the book was estimated to sell for $100,000, bidding soon turned that number into the tax, and Amazon paid out a hefty fee for the limited edition piece of history.

All is not lost though: The proceeds form the book go towards a charity that Rowling co-founded called Children’s Voice.

In addition, the Sotheby’s sale broke a number of records:

  • The highest price achieved at auction for a modern literary manuscript.
  • The highest price achieved at auction for a work by J.K. Rowling.
  • The highest price achieved at auction for a children’s book.

I guess that’s quite the thank-you.

[Via: Mashable]

…The Amazon Kindle has been disassembled?

Amazon Kindle Disassembled

As with all new and heavily hyped tech products, the Amazon Kindle has been gutted and examined from every angle to determine exactly what’s inside.

It’s not exactly the most exciting undressing, but some people seem to love this type of tech porn, so if you like to see what everything is made of, then this link is for you.

[Amazon Kindle Disassembly And Take-Apart Guide]

[Via: The Raw Feed]

…The Amazon Kindle needs more bookishness?

Amazon Kindle

When Amazon designed the Kindle, they wanted it to have “an aura of bookishness”.

Unfortunately, these bookishness dreams did not transfer over into the actual design, as the Kindle is filled with style for the sake of style, unusual proportions, senseless shapes, and a general lack of bookishness.

Click the link for a full breakdown of how Amazon missed the mark, and how they can change it for Kindle 2.0.

[Well… – Bookishness]