Tag Archives | Low Budget

…It’s TGI Friday: Pixel Force: Left 4 Dead?

Pixel Force: Left 4 Dead

Eric Ruth’s Pixel Force: Left 4 Dead is the game that Valve would have made for the Nintendo Entertainment System if they had been around back in 1986.

The game is identical to Left 4 Dead… if L4D were put through a time machine and returned after having gone through the full 8-bit treatment, including appearance and sound. Just because it looks low budget doesn’t mean that Eric skimped on features though, since you can play either by yourself or with a friend in two-player co-op mode, and all four of the original survivors, two tiers of weapons and four of the original game campaigns are included.

Unfortunately it’s Windows only at the moment, but if you’re looking for something to do over the weekend, then take a trip down memory lane with Pixel Force: Left 4 Dead.

[Pixel Force: Left 4 Dead]

…Kama turned an escalator into animation?

Kama used an escalator, some stickers and a well-timed camera to create a very interesting, low budget animation:

[Via: Wooster Collective]

…Be Kind Rewind is creative?

Be Kind Rewind

How do you advertise for a movie about two video store employees that replace erased tapes with low budget recreations?

Simple: Replace the trailer with a low budget recreation.


Low Budget:


BTW: Be sure to check out the Be Kind website, as it has also been “Sweded”, and is one of the best movie sites I’ve seen in some time.

[Be Kind Rewind]

[Via: Cinematical]

…Spiders can be dangerous?

SpiderSpider is a rather clever action-thriller short from Australian director Nash Edgerton that “gives an all-new meaning to old Peugeots, stunning blondes and love-jokes”.

With Nash playing Jack, and Mirrah Foulkes playing Jill, it’s definitely a low budget affair, but the results are still rather entertaining.

Just remember: It’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye.

Caution: This film is probably not for the squeamish.

[Blue-Tongue Films]

…CCTV helps make great films?

CCTV film making is an interesting concept that lends itself well to filming alternative and sometimes illegal activities like free-running.

By “video sniffing” the signal from wireless CCTV networks, filmmakers are able to capture the images from these existing cameras and use them for their own creative vision.

This film, called The Duellists, was shot inside of a shopping center using the central control room’s 160 cameras over the course of three nights:

It’s not exactly the highest of quality, but sometimes, low budget is the way to go.

[Via: We Make Money Not Art]