Main Menu

Tag Archives | New-York

…It’s Movie Monday: Fridges?

Nothing says dark digital short like…fridges?

Animator Fujio Tanabe’s short, called Fridges, was part of New York’s Japan Cuts, an annual festival of Japanese cinema, and takes a dark look at the often overlooked appliance that’s probably lurking in your kitchen right now.

Do you know where your leftovers are?

[Via: New York Magazine]

…Bomb It explores graffiti?

Bomb It

Bomb It “is the explosive new documentary from award-winning director Jon Reiss investigating the most subversive and controversial art form currently shaping international youth culture: graffiti”.

    Through interviews and guerilla footage of graffiti writers in action on 5 continents, Bomb It tells the story of graffiti from its origins in prehistoric cave paintings thru its notorious explosion in New York City during the 70’s and 80’s, then follows the flames as they paint the globe. Featuring old school legends and current favorites such as Taki 183, Cornbread, Stay High 149, T-Kid, Cope 2, Zephyr, Revs, Os Gemeos, KET, Chino, Shepard Fairey, Revok, and Mear One. This cutting edge documentary tracks down today’s most innovative and pervasive street artists as they battle for control over the urban visual landscape. You’ll never look at public space the same way again.

Locations include Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Tijuana, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Hamburg, Berlin, Cape Town, São Paulo, and Tokyo, so all the hot spots are covers as well.

Conclusion: If you have even a passing interest in graffiti, its history, its effect, and its current status, then Bomb It looks like a can’t miss film.

[Bomb It]

[Via: Juxtapoz]

…Michael Neff loves chalk?

Michael Neff - Chalk

Michael Neff’s Chalk series is a terrific idea in which he outlines various objects’ shadows in chalk, and then photographs them at night, giving each shadow an odd, sort of radiating glow.

So far, cities that he’s done this in include New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and a small town in Oregon, and the series is ongoing, so he has plans for more in the future.

[Flickr – Michael Neff – Chalk]

[Via: Noisy Descent Graphics]

…Everything Must Go?

Everything Must Go

GrandOpening, the store featured previously on DYH, has just reopened, and is now called Everything Must Go, The Lower East Side Auction House.

    It’s spring! Empty your apartment of all that drab furniture. Better yet, move and leave all that old stuff behind. This weekend, The Lower East Side Auction House can help you get started.

It looks to be yet another very successful iteration of the GrandOpening idea, so if you’re in the New York area, then definitely stop by and check it out.

[Grand Opening – Everything Must Go]

…It’s Movie Monday: Black Gold?

Black Gold

Black Gold is “a story about coffee and trade”.

    Multinational coffee companies now rule our shopping malls and supermarkets and dominate the industry worth over $80 billion, making coffee the most valuable trading commodity in the world after oil.

    But while we continue to pay for our lattes and cappuccinos, the price paid to coffee farmers remains so low that many have been forced to abandon their coffee fields.

    Nowhere is this paradox more evident than in Ethiopia, the birthplace of coffee. Tadesse Meskela is one man on a mission to save his 74,000 struggling coffee farmers from bankruptcy. As his farmers strive to harvest some of the highest quality coffee beans on the international market, Tadesse travels the world in an attempt to find buyers willing to pay a fair price.

    Against the backdrop of Tadesse’s journey to London and Seattle, the enormous power of the multinational players that dominate the world’s coffee trade becomes apparent. New York commodity traders, the international coffee exchanges, and the double dealings of trade ministers at the World Trade Organization reveal the many challenges Tadesse faces in his quest for a long term solution for his farmers.

It looks like a fascinating film, and definitely brings light to an issue that few Americans consider while waiting in line at the local Starbucks.

[Black Gold]