Tag Archives | Pace

…Bee Gees can really keep you stayin’ alive?

Here’s a tip that could save a life: Apparently, the Bee Gees’ 1977 hit “Stayin’ Alive” is the perfect song to pace yourself with when doing CPR.

The song’s 103 beats per minute is close enough to the 100 chest compressions per minute recommended by the American Heart Association, and it’s more appropriate than the similarly tempo’ed song from Queen, “Another One Bites the Dust”.

[Via: Boing Boing]

…SynchStep gives your life a beat?


If you’ve always wanted to have your own soundtrack, then check out SynchStep for the iPhone and iPod Touch.

SynchStep taps into the iPhone and iPod Touch’s motion sensor, and matches your music library to your pace. The result is that “every step you take lands in-time with a drum hit, a bass pluck, a piano chord”.

Unfortunately the beat that follows your feet is only available in “sucktacular beta” for now, but when the SDK goes live, prepare yourself for tons of fantastic apps just like this one.


[Via: Advertising Lab]

…Cloverfield was unique?


One of my favorite aspects of Cloverfield was that they didn’t give a lot away in the previews, so I’m going to try and review it without giving a lot away as well, because I think that you should go see it with as little information about it as possible.

Thus, a brief synopsis:

(Warning: Though I’m trying not to, this may contain some small spoilers, so if you want to go in with a pure mind, I suggest you read this after you see the film.)

The Good:

  • Like I said, I knew little to nothing about this film going in, because they decided to go with vague trailers as opposed to the current trend of using the trailer as a mini-version of the movie.
  • The ‘Blaire Witch’ style camera work added to the sense of realism, and kept you on edge the whole time.
  • The pace and tone of the film was so good that for an entire hour and a half, no one in my theater spoke a word. No one. I can’t remember the last time that happened.

The Bad:

  • The monster had a bit of a scale issue. One minute it’s tearing down building; the next it’s going after individual people. Perhaps it just changed tastes half way through, but it seems like it couldn’t pick a size.
  • They don’t explain much. Where did the monster come from? Why is it unaffected by our counter-monster measures? Why is the film named Cloverfield?

All in all, I’d say it was about as good as a monster movie can get. They kept you on the edge of your seat the whole time, they kept things somewhat believable, and they didn’t oversell any of it. While I don’t think that this was the ‘Movie of the Year’ by any means (and I’ve already basically give that nomination to Juno), it was a very entertaining film, and I definitely suggest going to see it.

Grade: B+
Theater Worthy: Yes

Note: For a great article on how Cloverfield advertised without advertising, check out MTV’s coverage of the Cloverfield viral-marketing campaign.


[MTV – Cloverfield Viral-Marketing]

[Rotten Tomatoes – Cloverfield]