Tag Archives | Publisher

…Zinio is giving away free magazines?

Zinio Read Green Initiative

Edit: This promotion is no longer active.

Zinio takes many of your favorite magazines and republishes them digitally, so to help spread the word about their rather environmentally friendly service, they created the Read Green Initiative to give away free magazine subscriptions to anyone that asks.

For a limited time, you can get a year-long subscription to magazines like Men’s Journal, Shutterbug, Road and Track, Popular Science, Outside and even Penthouse for little more than an email address.

In addition, they don’t take your mailing address or ask you to put down a credit card ‘deposit’, so there’s no need to worry about canceling your subscription at the end of the year in order to avoid getting charged.

If you’d like to preview what the service is like, just select from one of the magazines below, and if you’d like to sign up for your own free magazine subscription, just visit the site and select from the available options. (They’re first come, first served, so grab the one you want quickly before it’s gone.)

[Zinio – Read Green Initiative]

…It’s Things Thursday: Steam storewide sale?


Valve is on top of the gaming world right now, and their Steam system is a great way to get new games.

If you’ve been holding off on getting yourself The Orange Box (and if you have a PC, you NEED this set of games), or any of the other titles in Valve’s repertoire (BioShock, Call of Duty, Quake, etc.) then be sure to check out their first-ever Steam storewide sale.

Every game in every genre from every developer and publisher on Steam is now on sale, and you can save 10-50% through January 1st. Plus, if you’re trying to make up for a poorly chosen gift, they also allow you to give the gift of game to friends and family through the Steam system.


[Via: Steam – News]

…Amie Street wants to change the way you buy music?

Amie Street

Amie Street is a new way of purchasing music online that “combines the best elements of social networking, online music retail and discovery engines”. Independent artists can promote and sell their DRM free music, and fans can explore, recommend and buy that music. All songs start out free, and the price rises (up to a max of 98 cents) as the song becomes more popular. That way, new stuff gets discovered and expensive stuff is probably going to be worth the cost. When a user finds a song they like, they can recommend it to their friends, and earn credits towards future music purchases as the song rises in popularity. It’s definitely an interesting concept, and one that I like a lot. Hopefully more publishers will come to realize that they need to change the way people buy music.

[Amie Street]

[Via: Boing Boing]