Tag Archives | Race

…Red Bull lets you customize your own Soapbox Racer?

RedBull Soapbox Racer

If you liked Red Bull’s Flugtag Flight Lab, then check out the Soapbox Racer site, where you can design your own soapbox racer and race it on your own track against friends from around the world.

There are plenty of options to tweak and customize, so get those creative juices flowing and see what you can do behind the wheel.

[Red Bull Soapbox Racer]

…Indy racing is filled with information?

Indy 500 Car Tracker

The Indy 500 Car Tracker that The Indianapolis Star put together for last weekend’s race is a very interesting way of looking at racing.

As you watch each lap tick away in under a second, you can really get a feel for how the cars jockey for position, how they plan their pit strategy, and who is pulling away from whom.

[Indy 500 Car Tracker]

[Via: Kottke]

…Weekend racing is expensive?

GT3 Race Cars

If you dream of spending weekends pounding the pavement in your very own four wheeled speed machine, but don’t have a clue about where to start or what to do, then check out Speed:Sport:Life’s guide to the real costs and stories behind entry-level sedan racing.

From 24 Hours of Lemons and SCCA to NASA and the Speed World Challenge, SSL will show you everything from how to race for less than $1000 per weekend to how to race for $50,000 per weekend and beyond.

It might not be for everyone, but if you’ve got a need, then SSL will show you how to get some speed.

[Speed:Sport:Life – Exploring The Pyramid of Speed — The Real Costs and Stories Behind Entry-Level Sedan Racing]

…Formula DRIFT invaded the streets of Long Beach?

Formula D Vaughn Gittin Jr.

Formula DRIFT kicked off the 2009 season last Saturday, and with a new race format and new rules designed to increase the number of rounds during the main event, there was plenty of action on the streets of Long Beach. In the end, last year’s champion Tanner Foust edged out Robbie Nishida for third place, and after a close final, Ryan Tuerck took home his first win of the season over Samuel Hubinette.

Formula D Tanner Foust

Cars that made their debut at the event include Tanner Foust’s new NASCAR V8 powered Scion tC, Vaughn Gittin Jr.’s new 2010 Mustang GT, and Rhys Millen’s new Hyundai Genesis Coupe. Absent from the competition was Samuel Hubinette’s new Dodge Challenger, though the team did tease it from the trailer, and it looked like it will be ready for battle soon.

Formula D Calvin Wan Crash

Not surprisingly, Long Beach was home to a few spectacular crashes, including Ken Gushi’s slide into the wall on Friday that knocked him out of the competition, and Tommy Suell and Katsuhiro Ueo’s crash during qualifying that crushed the left side of Tommy’s AE86 and prevented him from competing. On Saturday, Conrad Grunewald smacked his Corvette into the tire wall after following Ryan Tuerck too wide into turn 10, Calvin Wan hit the wall in a solo crash while battling Ryan Tuerck, and Vaughn Gitten Jr. and Samuel Hubinette tangled heading into the final turn, leaving Gitten’s Mustang with a bit of a nose job and Hubinette’s Viper with a crumpled rim.

Formula D Robbie Nishida

Formula DRIFT now heads to Road Atlanta for Round 2 on May 8th and 9th, and judging by what was seen at Long Beach, the 2009 season is going to be a good one.

(Also be sure to check out the full gallery at my Flickr page.)

[Flickr – Formula DRIFT, Long Beach]

[Formula DRIFT]

…Shimano wants to shift the way bikes change gears?

Shimano Derailleurs

When speed is everything, anything that shaves off a few seconds can mean the difference between winning and losing, so for Shimano’s new bicycle derailleurs, they’ve gotten rid of cables all together and replaced them with computer controlled motors and gear selectors in an effort to provide smoother and more consistent shifts during the most demanding of races.

They’re not without their detractors however:

“People choose bicycles precisely because a bicycle’s motion requires only human effort, and nothing could be more simple, independent and autonomous,” said Raymond Henry, a cycling historian in St. Etienne, France. “Any source of external energy, however weak, runs counter to this philosophy.”

As with any new technology, these things don’t come cheap, and initial systems are expected to add about $1,250 onto the cost of an already expensive system, but if they can prove their reliability and speed up a rider’s pace, they just might be shifting the gears of every high-dollar race bike in a few years time.

[Via: The New York Times Via: Gizmodo]