Tag Archives | Recyclable

…Amazon wants to cure Wrap Rage?

Wrap Rage

Amazon is fighting back against “wrap rage”, or “the frustration we humans feel when trying to free a product from a nearly impenetrable package”, by releasing a line of products that arrive in “Frustration-Free Packaging”.

By working with manufacturers to deliver products in smaller, easy-to-open, recyclable cardboard boxes with less packaging material (and no frustrating plastic clamshells or wire ties) Amazon hopes to eliminate this “wrap rage” over the course of the multi-year initiative.

As an occasional victim of wrap rage due to busted knuckles and excessive garbage, I definitely hope they reach their goal, and since they’ve stated that they want to offer their entire catalog of products in Frustration-Free Packaging in a few years, it definitely seems like they’re heading in the right direction.

[Amazon – Frustration-Free Packaging]

…Project 7 will change the world?

Project 7

Project 7 is ambitious: They want to heal the sick, save the Earth, house the homeless, feed the hungry, help those in need, build the future, and hope for peace.

The idea actually came out of the seven deadly sins. The thought was that “What if man in his selfishness instead of focusing on abstaining from the 7 sins worked to help those that were a consequence of one of these 7?”

For example: What if a “glutton” stopped focusing on himself, and started focusing on helping those that were starving.

The company’s goal is to bring to market everyday products— the first of which is bottled water—that consumers can easily purchase in order to effect change across the seven areas of critical need.

The goal is to make it an easy change for consumers, as the products look and taste the same as their non-Project-7 counterparts, but more than 50 percent of the profits go towards a community piggy-bank.

Throughout the year, nonprofits that benefit on of the seven causes can apply to be the recipient of that piggy-bank, and Project 7 will select three finalists for each. Then, they invite the consumers to vote online for the organization within each area that will receive the proceeds collected throughout the year.

To help get things started, Project 7 has even committed to donating $15,000 to nonprofits supporting each of the seven areas of critical need, totaling a minimum donation of $105,000 in 2009.

Project 7 uses Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles that are 100 percent recyclable, and will even package those bottles in boxes made from 100 percent recyclable material and printed with soy inks.

Is this the future of consumer-based activism?

Time will tell, but it sure looks like it’s off to a good start!

[Project 7]

[Via: Josh Spear]

…Dell’s Studio Hybrid packs an environmental punch?

Dell Studio Hybrid

Dell’s new Studio Hybrid line of computers is a rather interesting offering.

Designed to be an “anywhere-you-want-it-desktop”, the pint-sized PC comes in six colors, as well as bamboo, features an ultra-compact design with Intel mobile technology performance, a slot-load DVD, HDMI, digital/analog TV tuner, and optional Blu-ray for home entertainment duties.

In addition, the Dell Hybrid helps to preserve the planet as Dell’s greenest and most power-efficient consumer desktop (75% less printed documentation, 70% less power usage, Energy Star 4.0 compliant, and packaging made form 95% recyclable materials).

A good-looking computer that’s good for the environment and performs too?

What’s not to love?

[Dell – Studio Hybrid]

…Recycling is good for the planet?


If you recycle (and you should), then you probably separate out what’s recyclable from what’s not, put both on the curb, and never think about it again.

But what happens when you recycle?

How does it work? Is it worth the effort? Is recycling waste just going into a landfill?

The Economist decided to tackle all these questions and more, and put together a great piece called The Truth About Recycling.

    If done right, there is no doubt that recycling saves energy and raw materials, and reduces pollution. But as well as trying to recycle more, it is also important to try to recycle better. As technologies and materials evolve, there is room for improvement and cause for optimism. In the end, says Ms Krebs, “waste is really a design flaw.”

[The Economist – The Truth About Recycling]