Tag Archives | Rocket

…The G-Power BMW M5 Hurricane RS is fast?

G-Power BMW M5 Hurricane RS

What has four doors, two superchargers, a V10, and goes 228.4 mph?

If you answered G-Power’s BMW M5 Hurricane RS, then you’d be correct! (And you’d probably work for G-Power as well.)

The company set its sights on the Brabus CLS ‘Rocket’, which was the previous record holder for four-door cars with a top speed of 227.23 mph, and says that they can get even more power from the car by increasing the boost from the twin chargers.

It’s not like the car will ever see anything even close to that on public roads, since the company had to take the car to a test track to reach the monster numbers, but I guess it’s good to know that when needed, you could outrun most planes in style and luxury!


[Via: Autoblog]

…It’s Tuner Tuesday: Bloodhound SSC?

Bloodhound SSC

The Bloodhound SSC is more rocket than car, and aims to shatter the current world land speed record with a goal of 1,000 mph, or 31% faster than any four-wheeled vehicle has gone before.

Powering the Bloodhound SSC is a jet/hybrid rocket mix that uses a rocket for its raw power and a lack of draggy air intake, and a Eurojet EJ-200 jet engine for controlled output that allows the Bloodhound SSC team to increase Mach numbers in small, careful steps.

In addition to power, the Bloodhound SSC needs to be controllable, so little winglets above each wheel act as fully dynamic trimmers that make small adjustments in microsconds to maintain constant wheel load up to Mach 1.4.

Bloodhound SSC Detail

In the middle of the Bloodhound SSC sits a MCT V12 race engine that makes over 800 horsepower. This might sound like an impressive figure, but when you’re goal is 1,000 mph, it’s not even close to what you need, so the V12 is just there for hydraulic power, starting the EJ-200, and pumping more than a ton of High Test Peroxide through the Falcon rocket in just 22 seconds at 1200 psi.

Another important element of a car like this that few people think about is the airflow. The fin needs to be a balance of high speed stability and low speed wind resistance, and even the rear wheel covers have been designed to minimize drag caused by the airflow around the wheel, since an unprotected wheel would see oncoming airflow at the top reach speeds of Mach 2.8 if left unprotected.

So what does a run to 1,000 mph look like?

Bloodhound SSC Record Run

Bloodhound SSC will accelerate from rest using an EJ-200 jet engine, taking it up to 300mph.
At that point (a) the rocket will be ignited, so that it and the jet are operating simultaneously, thereby increasing the acceleration to well over 2g.

Having reached maximum speed (1,050mph), the rocket thrust will be stopped (point b), but the jet engine will continue burning for a few seconds.

During this brief period, the car will decelerate at about 1.5g. When the jet engine also stops (point c), the deceleration will peak at nearly 3g.

When the vehicle slows to subsonic speeds the aerodynamic drag will reduce dramatically, slowing the deceleration of the vehicle. Two additional deceleration peaks are shown on the curves (points d and e), indicating the release of two parachutes. At low speeds, below 200mph, hydraulically operated disc brakes can be used.

The land speed record is calculated from the average times of the car over two runs (to eliminate the effect of wind and other variables) so the car must then stop, refuel, turn around, and do the run all over again within an hour to claim the title.

Can they do it?

We’ll just have to wait to find out, but it sure looks like they’re taking steps in the right direction!

[Bloodhound SSC]

…It’s TGI Friday: Soda Bottle Rocket?

Fireworks might be outlawed in most fire-prone places, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun this Fourth of July weekend by shooting things into the sky.

Make has put together a fantastic set of instructions for creating your very own Soda Bottle Rocket, and before you know it, you’ll be shooting rockets into the night sky like the big boys.

[Via: Make: Blog]

…It’s Things Thursday: Valentine One?

Alex Roy

When Alex Roy drives, Alex Roy drives fast.

The veteran of numerous rallies, races, and records, he recently drove from New York to Santa Monica in 31 hours and 4 minutes, beating the previous transcontinental record by over an hour. To give you an idea of the kind of speed it takes to break a record like that, think about this: Roy needed a sustained speed of almost 90 miles per hour.

For 31 hours!

So what kind of technology does it take to pilot a four-wheel rocket through 31,000 highly trained highway patrol?

  • Tasco 8 x 40 binoculars with a Kenyon KS-2 gyro stabilizer
  • Military spec Steiner 7 x 50 binoculars
  • Bumper-mounted L-3 Raytheon NightDriver thermal camera
  • Flush, bumper-mounted Blinder M40 laser jammers
  • Redundant Garmin StreetPilot 2650 GPS units
  • Preprogrammed Uniden police radio scanners
  • Ceiling-mounted Uniden CB radio with high-gain whip antenna
  • And last but not least, a Valentine One radar/laser detector

Valentine One

Since 1992, Valentine has been making a radar detector that refuses to loose. It’s a company that only makes radar detectors, only make ones model of radar detector (constantly upgraded with the latest technology), and only makes the best radar detector, so you know that they mean business.

On my recent trip to Las Vegas for the SEMA show, I had a chance to check out the capabilities of my newly purchased V1, and I must say, I was beyond impressed. Not only did it constantly keep me aware of what was going on around me (the patented arrows tell you with amazing accuracy if the radar is in front of, beside, or behind you), but it also saved me from at least one sure-fire ticket.

Coming down a hill with a clear lane and a tailwind, my car was more than happy to break the posted speed limit, and trusting in the powers of the V1, I was more than happy to oblige.

Suddenly, the V1 flashed Ka band, and maxed out the signal strength indicator, showing sure signs of a cop ahead. Heading the warning, I quickly brought the car down to posted speeds, and peered ahead for the awaiting cruiser. After about a mile of driving, I came upon the hidden cruiser, tucked neatly under an overpass with his radar gun pointed directly down the road that I had just traveled. Just past him though, there were three other cruisers parked and waiting to pick up what the radar gun picked off. It was a speed trap, and thanks to the V1, I had easily avoided it.

Chock one up in the V1 win column.

Though you can’t exactly call the Valentine One cheap, it’s a definite case of you get what you pay for. (And it’s also probably cheaper than getting a ticket.) Plus, if Alex Roy trusts it to drive across the country, shouldn’t you trust it to drive the kids to soccer? (Quickly.)

Also, having tested out a few other radar detectors over the years, I can confirm Valentine’s claims that the V1 is the easiest to use, most reliable, and gave the best warning time out of the bunch.

Your driving record will thank you.

(For more information about Alex Roy’s record run, check out his book, The Driver, and his documentary, 32 Hours 7 Minutes.)

[Valentine One]

[32 Hours 7 Minutes]

[Wired Magazine – The Pedal-to-the-Metal, Totally Illegal, Cross-Country Sprint for Glory]

[Team Polizei 144]

…It’s Tuner Tuesday: Formula Drift?

Formula Drift Logo

On Saturday, I had the chance to go and see Formula D’s “The Finals” at Irwindale Speedway (yes, I did get stuck on Interstate 5 on the way down from San Francisco due to that massive accident), and I must say, if you’re at all a fan of the four wheeled machine, make sure you check out one of Formula Drift’s events at a track near you.

Pontiac Solstice

If you’re not familiar with the sport, think of drifting as two automotive ballerinas battling it out in a boxing match. It’s gracefully controlled mayhem, and in my opinion, it’s easily the best form of four-wheeled entertainment on the planet.
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