Main Menu

Tag Archives | Scientist

…Papercraft scientists and game consoles can be fun?

If you’ve been bitten by the papercraft bug, but can’t seem to find enough ways to feed it, then check out the Papercraft Scientists and Papercraft Game Consoles.

The Scientists feature Albert Einstein, Carl Sagan and Charles Darwin:

Papercraft Scientists

And the Game Consoles include the Commodore 64, the Atari 2600, and the Pong Arcade:

Foldskool Heroes

Each one can be made at home by printing out the pattern, cutting and folding the figure according to the instructions.

[Papercraft Scientists Via: Neatorama]

[Game Consoles Via: Gizmodo]

…Science has created the ultimate Jell-O shot?

Jell-O Shots

Creating the ultimate Jell-O shot might not be the dream of every scientist, but for a few determined drunkards, the thought of a shot that doubled, tripled, or even quadrupled the amount of alcohol found in a typical Jell-O shot was too tempting to resist.

The purpose of this experiment was to determine the highest possible concentration of alcohol attainable in a Jell-O shot, while still maintaining the structural integrity (i.e., the gelling properties) of the gelatin.

Through rigorous scientific testing, two dozen batches of Jell-O shots, and nearly five 1.75 liter bottles of vodka, they discovered that “too much is much, much more than we would have guessed”.

Read on to discover the secret behind the ultimate Jell-O shot:

[My Science Project – The Ultimate Jell-O Shot]

…Humans are amazing?

I was trying to explain to someone how incredible I think the fact that we landed the Phoenix rover on the surface of Mars is, and was unfortunately coming up short for words.

However, I think this picture does it pretty good justice:

Phoenix Parachute

Not much to see, eh?

Well, think about this: What you’re seeing is a photo of the Phoenix rover as it descends to the surface of Mars under its own parachute. The photo was taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s HiRISE camera as it circles a planet that is tens to hundreds of millions of miles away. As it circles that planet, it’s tracking and photographing a man made object that is gracefully touching down onto the surface of that planet under the guide of its own parachute. Both objects are acting remotely and robotically, and then sending their data back to earth at the speed of light (and it still takes 15 minutes to get here). In short: We created a remote controlled vehicle, shot it millions of miles into the sky, landed it on a precise location on another planet, and then programmed it to run its own scientific experiments and then report back to us with the results.

See what I mean?

[Image Via: Bad Astronomy Blog]

Also, if you’d like to keep track of the rover, follow it on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MarsPhoenix

(What I like most about the Phoenix Twitter is that it’s probably one of the smartest people in the world (a NASA scientist) that has to dumb down what he’s saying and then put it into the third person so that the rest of us can understand what’s going on. Somewhere there’s a guy sitting in a room that’s hating life and wondering when he can leave his Twitter post and get back to playing with the world’s coolest remote control car.)

…Danger makes the world go slower?

SkydivingEver wonder why time seems to slow down during moments of danger?

According to David Eagleman, a scientist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston:

    When a person is scared, a brain area called the amygdala becomes more active, laying down an extra set of memories that go along with those normally taken care of by other parts of the brain.

    “In this way, frightening events are associated with richer and denser memories,” Eagleman explained. “And the more memory you have of an event, the longer you believe it took.”

    Eagleman added this illusion “is related to the phenomenon that time seems to speed up as you grow older. When you’re a child, you lay down rich memories for all your experiences; when you’re older, you’ve seen it all before and lay down fewer memories. Therefore, when a child looks back at the end of a summer, it seems to have lasted forever; adults think it zoomed by.”

How did he test this theory?

    Researchers dropped volunteers from great heights. Scientists had volunteers dive backward with no ropes attached, into a special net that helped break their fall. They reached 70 mph during the roughly three-second, 150-foot drop.

    “It’s the scariest thing I have ever done,” said David. “I knew it was perfectly safe, and I also knew that it would be the perfect way to make people feel as though an event took much longer than it actually did.”

    Indeed, volunteers estimated their own fall lasted about a third longer than dives they saw other volunteers take.

Now you know.

[LifeScience – Why Time Seems to Slow Down in Emergencies]

[Via: Neatorama]

[Photo Via: SoldiersMediaCenter]

…Your bacon sandwich isn’t perfect?

Want to know a tasty math formula?

    Bacon SandwichN = C + {fb (cm) . fb (tc)} + fb (Ts) + fc . ta

    Where N=force in Newtons required to break the cooked bacon, fb=function of the bacon type, fc=function of the condiment/filling effect, Ts=serving temperature, tc=cooking time, ta=time or duration of application of condiment/filling, cm=cooking method, C=Newtons required to break uncooked bacon.


According to scientists at the Leeds University, if you can follow the above formula, you will have created the perfect bacon sandwich.

How do they know? They spent 1,000 hours testing 700 variations on the traditional bacon sandwich to discover that

    Two or three back bacon rashers should be cooked under a preheated oven grill for seven minutes at about 240C (475F).
    The bacon should then be placed between two slices of farmhouse bread, 1cm to 2cm thick.

Who knew science could be so delicious?

[BBC – Scientists ‘Perfect’ Bacon Butty]

[Via: Neatorama]