Tag Archives | Search-Engine

…PleaseDress.Me is tee-rific?


PleaseDress.Me is the ultimate t-shirt search engine.

Designed by Gary Vaynerchuk (of winelibrary.tv fame), AJ Vaynerchuk, and Joe Stump (lead architect for digg.com), PleaseDress.Me allows you to sift through the vast expanse of online t-shirts using searches by keyword/tag, color, price, or even random generation if you’re feeling especially indecisive.

    PleaseDressMe is a classic example of scratching ones own itch. AJ, Gary, and Joe love finding great new tees, but finding said tees wasn’t the easiest thing in the world. Rather than sifting through multiple websites [they] figured why not just go to one website that makes searching t-shirts easy? Once [they] came to that conclusion, Joe went right to coding and after a few calculated keystrokes [they] brought in Chris to make it pretty. The result is the simple, concise t-shirt search engine.

In addition to being a tee-rific resource for shirt enthusiasts, PleaseDress.Me is also a fantastic example of how to use Web 2.0 methods of promotion to get your product into the public eye.

PleaseDress.Me has an account on Twitter, a custom Firefox search box plugin, customizable widgets, an easy vendor upload process, a Facebook page, an open API, a send to a friend feature, badges for shirt vendors to display, and a full gamut of social bookmarking options, including Facebook, Digg, Pownce, Twitter, Delicious, and StumbleUpon.

So besides being a great example of how to promote a new website, does it actually work?

To test it out, I typed in the word “Ninja”, clicked Search, and was greeted with the following results:


A ninja playing a tuba, a teenage mutant ninja turtle in a shredder, a ninja and pirate shirt, and smurfs acting like ninjas?

I’d say it works pretty damn well.

Give it a shot:

Each result features the price, a more info button, a StumbleUpon button, a Facebook button, and a Buy Now button. Clicking on a result’s more info button gives you that shirt’s chosen tags, as well as related shirts that you can view as well.

All in all, I’d say that it’s a fantastic service that makes searching for and actually finding shirts you’re looking for a quick and easy process, and that anyone looking for that perfect shirt to complete that perfect outfit should definitely check it out.

Now PleaseDress.Me!


…Delicious looks delicious?


Delicious (the social bookmarking site formerly known as del.icio.us that calls itself “the tastiest bookmarks on the web” and was also the father of the strange domain name), launched its long awaited redesign yesterday to help move the site beyond its late ‘90s style.

Though the underlying functionality is still the same, the new look and feel is designed to make it faster, easier to learn, and hopefully more desirable.

    Speed: We’ve moved to a new infrastructure that makes every page faster. This new platform will enable us to keep up with traffic growth while ensuring Delicious is responsive and reliable. You may not have noticed, but the old backend was getting creaky under the load of five million users.

    Search: We’ve completely overhauled our search engine to make it faster and more powerful. Searches used to take ages to return results; now they’re very quick. The new search engine is also smarter, and more social: you can search within one of your tags, another public user’s bookmarks, or your social network. Now it’s easier to take advantage of the expertise and interests of your friends, not to mention the Delicious community at large.

    Design: Finally, we’ve updated the user interface to improve usability and add a few often-requested features (such as selectable detail levels and alphabetical sorting of bookmarks). Our goal has been to keep the new design similar in spirit to the old one, so all of you veterans should be able to jump in without any confusion. At the same time, we’re hoping that newcomers to Delicious will find it easier to learn.

I’m a big Delicious user (http://delicious.com/cory411), but since I use the Firefox plugin, I rarely if ever visit the site.

Delicious Screenshot

However, with looks like this, I just might have to give it a second chance.


…It’s Website Wednesday: Wikia Search?

Wikia Search

Wikia Search wants to take down the Google giant with a freely licensed (open source) search engine.

Since Google is now a $200 Billion company, it’s easy to assume that they’re going to be a bit guarded with regard to their search technology; as it is, after all, the driving force behind most of those billions.

However, Wikia Search feels that by putting users in control, they can create a search engine that works faster, is more accurate, and is more informative.

How is it going to do this?

By using the power of a community of users acting together in an open, transparent, and public way.

Their belief is that “search is a fundamental part of the infrastructure of the Internet, and that it can and should therefore be done in an open, objective, accountable way”.

Though it’s currently only an Alpha release (meaning the results are pretty bad because there is no user feedback data), as that data starts to roll in, expect the results to get better at an impressively quick pace. (At least that’s the hope.)

It’s definitely an interesting project, and I hope it’s successful too, because if it can do for search what Wikipedia did for the encyclopedia, then Google definitely needs to keep an eye on this David.

[Wikia Search]

…Google is tweaking?

Google Logo

As Google continues to reign supreme over the search engine kingdom, they are constantly tweaking and testing their algorithm to get the best possible results. Because this work often goes unnoticed, they decided to give Saul Hansell a rare look behind the curtain during one of their highly confidential quality meetings.

If you can’t get enough Goog news, then check out Saul’s article, as well as Matt Cutts’ response to the article that includes five things you didn’t know about Google’s search.

[New York Times – Google Keeps Tweaking Its Search Engine]

[Matt Cutts – Five Things You Didn’t Know About Google Search]

…Jimmy Wales wants to take down Google?

Jimmy Wales

Why is Jimmy “Jimbo” Wales smiling? Because you’d probably have to remind yourself to smile as well if you set your sights on a $150 billion search giant. Jimmy, the man behind Wikipedia, the sixth largest web site in the world, and home to more than 5.3 million entries in 100 languages edited by 280,000 volunteers, wants to create a new kind of search engine. Just as Wikipedia has changed the way we think about information, Jimmy wants his latest project, called Wikia, to change the way we think about search (and take down Google in the process). Fast Company recently profiled the man on a mission, and it’s inspirational to say the least. So can he do it? Can he turn Wikia into the new king of search? Only time will tell of course, but if anyone can do it, Jimbo can.

[Fast Company – Why Is This Man Smiling?]