Tag Archives | Short-Film

…It’s Movie Monday: CL!CK?

LEGO’s CL!CK is a fantastic short about the power of big ideas.

With stop motion animation, little toy bricks and an amazing mustache all combined together into one film, it’s a win all around:


…It’s Movie Monday: Oktapodi?


Oktapodi was recently nominated for an Oscar for Animated Short Film, and I can see why!

The story is quick and cute, the animation is fantastic, and it’s got a very unique style that sets it apart from the rest.



[Wikipedia – Oktapodi]

[Via: Motionographer]

…It’s Movie Monday: Bourbon?


Bourbon is a short film by Adam Woodworth about “a couple of small time gangsters, their plan to hit it big, and how it all came crashing down”.

Bourbon Awards

It won the Best Short Film award at the 2007 Plymouth Independent Film Festival, was nominated for Best Cinematography and Best Crime Short at the 2007 Hollywood Digital Video Festival, and was an official selection at the 2007 Ruff Cutz Indie Film Conference of Boston.

Below is the film in its entirety, but be sure to visit the Bourbon site as well for more information about this great piece of cinema:


…You need Validation?


Kurt Kuenne’s Validation is a fable about the magic of free parking.

Actually, it’s much more than that, but I’d rather not give away any of the surprise that this award-winning short film has in store, so I’ll keep the description simple and just say that it’s a must watch.

It’s also a heart warming and inspiring way to start off the week, so enjoy:

…It’s Movie Monday: Mankind Is No Island?

Mankind Is No Island

Tropfest is the world’s largest short film festival.

Founded at Sydney’s Tropicana café in 1993, it now has an attendance of over 150,000 in Australia each February, and thousands more in other cities through out the world at other local Tropfests.

This year, the $20,000 first prize at the Tropfest in New York went to a film called “Mankind Is No Island” which was shot entirely with a cell phone camera.

The music is perfect, the effect is simple yet powerful, and the end result is a very emotional film that challenges the way we look at the world.


[Via: Lens Culture]