Tag Archives | Surprising

…Jelli is here to kill the radio?

Jelli Logo

The radio is dead, and Jelli is here to replace it.

Ok, so maybe that’s a bit extreme, but the concept behind Jelli is a fascinating one, and does have the potential to change radio as we know it.


Essentially, Jelly is a single radio station that’s 100% listener controlled. Users can nominate songs, vote for songs they like, and bomb the ones they don’t, and the song with the most votes at the end of the currently playing track gets the next spot in line. The more you listen, the more power you gain, though even first timers have the ability to push a song over the edge.

The result is a mix of music that will surprise and delight, with an ever changing flow of community taste and creative control.

Just don’t expect to hear the Billboard Top 40 playing on repeat any time soon.


…Food Inc. wants to change the way you look at your food?

Food Inc.

The goal of Food Inc. is to lift the veil on our nation’s food industry and expose the highly mechanized underbelly that has been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA.

Our nation’s food supply is now controlled by a handful of corporations that often put profit ahead of consumer health, the livelihood of the American farmer, the safety of workers and our own environment. We have bigger-breasted chickens, the perfect pork chop, insecticide-resistant soybean seeds, even tomatoes that won’t go bad, but we also have new strains of E. coli—the harmful bacteria that causes illness for an estimated 73,000 Americans annually. We are riddled with widespread obesity, particularly among children, and an epidemic level of diabetes among adults.

Featuring interviews with such experts as Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation), Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto) along with forward thinking social entrepreneurs like Stonyfield’s Gary Hirshberg and Polyface Farms’ Joel Salatin, Food, Inc. reveals surprising—and often shocking truths—about what we eat, how it’s produced, who we have become as a nation and where we are going from here.

Though I do recommend seeing this film, I don’t recommend stopping by the popcorn counter first!

[Food Inc.]

…EepyBird is at it again?

EepyBird Sticky Note Experiment

EepyBird, the two man team that brought you the Diet Coke and Mentos Experiment, is back in the lab, and this time they’ve teamed up with ABC’s Samurai Girl to bring you The Extreme Sticky Note Experiments:

Though it’s not as surprising as the Diet Coke and Mentos video, it’s definitely impressive/beautiful, makes you look at Sticky Notes in a whole new light.

[Via: EepyBird Via: NOTCOT]

…Coins don’t need to have ridges?

Coin Ridges

Ever wonder why some coins have ridges, while others do not?

The answer is surprisingly simple:

When coins where made of gold or silver, the value of the coin was based on the value of the metal in it. Thus, a $10 gold coin had $10 worth of gold in it.

Before ridges, thieves would file off the edges of the coins and make a slow but steady profit from passing on the slightly smaller coins, while collecting the rest.

To prevent this practice, the government began minting ridges into the edges of coins so that you can easily tell if a coin has been tampered with.

Though coins are no longer made of gold or silver, they still have ridges, because we’re accustomed to seeing them that way.

Now you know.

[Via: Big Site Of Amazing Facts]

[Photo Via: Clearly Ambiguous]

…Albums can be art?

Album Cover Remix

Rather than remixing a song, why not remix album covers?

The results are surprising, and impressively coherent, though the time it must have taken to gather up all of these covers is beyond me.

Album Cover Remix 2

[Via: Afhakers]