Tag Archives | Toilet

…You can fix a wet computer?

Water Computer

Eventually, it’s going to happen: You’re going to spill something on your laptop, or drop your phone in the toilet, and assume that it’s gone to the big gadget graveyard in the sky. However, if you plan ahead and know the steps to take to save your device from a watery grave, there is a chance that you can save it from an early demise, as I recently discovered.

First, let me tell you my story: There is nothing more relaxing than sitting down with a laptop and a nice big cup of hot chocolate and reading through a few long blog posts or catching up on the latest viral videos. Recently however, the computer gods were not smiling down upon me, and after setting a full cup of hot chocolate on the table, I proceeded to reach over and try to type something, catch the top of the glass with my hand, and watch in slow motion as the entire cup poured itself on top of my MacBook’s keyboard. Normally, this would mean the hasty death of an otherwise healthy computer, but with a bit of quick thinking and an emergency, MacGuyver style surgery, I was actually able to save (and in the process clean) the laptop to let it live another day.

Since laptop deaths via liquid destruction seem to be a common occurrence, I wanted to share my experience in hopes that it will someday save you from the same situation and save a laptop from an unplanned bath. (Though I’m writing this after saving a laptop, the steps should work equally well for a cell phone, camera, or any other device that occasionally finds its way into the toilet bowl.)

How to save a soaked gadget:

  1. Unplug the device and take out the battery IMMEDIATELY! – Liquids are not the enemy here, liquids and power are, since that’s what’s going to cause power spikes and short circuits, so be sure to remove any and all sources of power as soon as possible.
  2. Dry the outside of the device – The goal here is to remove any extra liquid that could get into the device once you start taking things apart. Since there will already be some liquid inside, the last thing you want to do is make things worse.
  3. Disassemble the device – Liquid can find its way into the smallest nooks and crannies, so you’ll want to take apart and remove as many pieces and parts as possible so that you can uncover any hidden areas of moisture. For a good source of disassembly (and more importantly, reassembly) guides, check out iFixIt.
  4. Dry the inside of the device – Start with any big areas of wetness, and work your way down into the nooks and crannies. The goal here is to just start drying things, and chances are, even if it doesn’t look wet, it is, so you’ll want to give everything at least one, and preferably multiple rounds of drying. In my case, I used paper towels and cotton swabs, but towels, t-shirts, and even napkins will work as long as they won’t fall apart and leave little pieces of lint/paper/garbage in the device.
  5. Wash what gets dirty – This may seem counter-intuitive, but as I said before, liquid isn’t the enemy here, liquids and power are, so it’s sometimes OK to wash some parts that get especially dirty once you’ve got everything disassembled. Of course you’ll want to be smart about this step, so don’t go sticking your hard drive or your motherboard under the faucet, but for components without a lot of electrical parts, a good wash can do wonders to bring them back to life. In my case, the keyboard had a sticky residue from the chocolate that made all the keys stick while typing, so I removed the keyboard and soaked it in a bath of warm water for about five minutes. When your done washing, you’ll want to dry the part as quickly as possible, since lingering liquids are what will cause rust and other problems down the road. A hair dryer turned to high speeds with low heat works well here for getting all of the liquid out of the small areas, but just do your best to get it as dry as possible as quickly as possible with whatever you have on hand.
  6. Wait – Even after you think everything is dry, there will more than likely be a few areas that are still wet that you didn’t get to, so you’ll want to wait at least 24 hours before putting the device back together to ensure that everything has had a chance to completely dry out. In my case, I put the laptop in front of a fan and let the fan run for a day, but if that’s not an option for you, just give it a little extra time in the open before putting it back together.
  7. Reassemble the device – Once everything is clean and dry, you just need to put it back together and see if all of your quick thinking and hard work has paid off. Typically everything is going to go back on in the reverse order of how it came off, but be sure to check back with your instructions for any details.
  8. Test the device – Cross your fingers, close your eyes, and press the power button. In the best-case scenario, the device will turn on immediately and act like nothing ever happened. In the worst-case scenario, the device will do nothing, and you’ll now have a very expensive paperweight on your hands. In that case, you can sometimes still save some of the parts for a last ditch effort, such as a laptop screen that you can swap onto a laptop from eBay with a broken screen, but other than that, you’ve now sacrificed a device to the water gods.

If you’re not willing or able to take your device apart due to lack of skills, tools or both, the next best bet is to remove any source of power (power plug and battery) and then just let the device sit for a few days before turning it on again. I’ve also heard of situations where people put their device in a container full of rice for a day or two and had that work, since the rice draws out the moisture, so you might want to try that as well. In any case, it’s at least worth trying to save your gadget, so don’t just assume that because it got a little wet that it’s never going to work again.

…Extended Stay hotel rooms are clean?

Toilet Licker

Need to demonstrate the cleanliness of a hotel room?

Forget scientific tests, black lights and Petri dishes.

All it takes is a girl, her tongue, and a complete lack of oral hygiene.

OCDers and germaphobes, turn away now…

(Be sure to check out extstay.com for more tongue-tastic taste tests.

[ExtStay.com]

…SKAGGS shot a lot of water?

Water Bottles

A TOTO HET toilet can save up to 24,655 gallons of water per year, but how do you show that visually so that you can truly grasp what a number like that means?

That’s the question that SKAGGS faced for their latest photo shoot, and the answer involved “2 months of planning, 1 trip from El Paso to Dallas and back, 1,000 – 5 gallon water bottles, 3 trucks, 2 tractors, 1 buggy and a whole lot of man (and woman) power”.

Click the links for a rather interesting behind the scenes.

[SKAGGS – Water, Water Everywhere!]

[Flickr – Totology Photo Shoot]

[Via: NOTCOT]

…Kohler makes a Class Five toilet?

Kohler Class Five

To advertise for their Class Five toilet system, Kohler has created an interactive video where you command plumber Jo to try and clog the toilet with various items spread around the bathroom. Poor duckie.

[Kohler – Class Five]

[Via: Say No To Crack]

…It’s April Fools’ Day?

Today is one of the Internet’s favorite holidays. Though I’m not going to try and trick any of the DYH readers (I promise), I am going to be covering the hoaxes and pranks that appear around the net. Here are some of the better ones:

Google Paper

Google announced Gmail Paper, a permanent archive service that prints your emails for free onto paper that is supported by giant ads that are printed on the back. It handles attachments, is good for the environment, and there is no limit on the number of times you can use it.

Google TiSP

Google announced TiSP, a free in-home wireless broadband service that taps into your toilet. The service is supported by the use of “information gathered by discreet DNA sequencing of your personal bodily output to display online ads that are contextually relevant to your culinary preferences, current health status and likelihood of developing particular medical conditions going forward”.

Random Crap

Woot sold a $1,000,001 bag of crap. When users clicked on the picture of the bag, they were given a coupon code that knocked the cost down to $1.

Fucked Company

Tech Crunch, a site that focuses on Web 2.0 startups, announced that it had acquired Fucked Company, a site that focuses on Web 2.0 shutdowns.

ThinkGeek

ThinkGeek announced “stuff for smart asses”, including a WiiHelm(et), an 8-bit tie, inhalable caffeine stix, and a lonely guy dream vacation digital photo frame. (They also announced that the iPhone was now shipping, but that’s just cruel.)

CollegeHumor GoDaddy

CollegeHumor made it look as if their domain had expired and was now for sale through GoDaddy.

haterTonic

Technorati switched around their letters and renamed their site haterTonic.

Tinfoil Hat

World Of Warcraft introduced a new item called the Tinfoil Hat. “Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they’re not out to get you”.

CrunchGear

CrunchGear gave their entire site a 1999 redesign, complete with flashy gifs, a horrible background, and a no structure (though it still reminds me of a lot of current MySpace profile pages).

[Wikipedia – April Fools’ Day]